Personal Emergency Preparedness Workbook 

 

You can find a word document version of our Workbook here or a PDF version of our Workbook here

Introduction

One of the most important aspects of independent living is developing the capacity to keep ourselves safe at home, work, and in the community. This is why The Independence Center is pleased to offer this workbook to help people with disabilities plan for emergencies. Having an emergency plan in place will increase your confidence in your own ability to stay safe in a disaster situation. And, all of the pages in this workbook are available here at The Independence Center's Website so that you can print them out and update your information regularly.

This workbook will guide you through the process of gathering the information and supplies you will need if a disaster strikes. It is filled with worksheets, checklists, and tips to help you prepare for an emergency. That way you have all of the information you need to make sure that you continue to live independently if you should ever need to evacuate your home, work, or school. You may want to make copies of these pages so that you can keep them up to date in the months and years to come.

Before you start filling out the pages in this workbook, it is important to start thinking about three people you can share information with. These individuals will be part of your Personal Support Network. You may have different Personal Support Networks at home, work, school, or anyplace you spend a great deal of time. The people in your Personal Support Network will work with you to prepare for a disaster.

Keep in mind that according to Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with disabilities are protected from discrimination on the basis of disability when it comes to state and local government services.  That means that our community may not be excluded from participation or denied benefits from programs, activities, and services including emergency services that the state and local government provide to others.  Since we are focusing on emergency services, those services include mitigation (making your neighborhood or home safer from fire), planning for how to respond to an emergency, response (including alerts, evacuations, and sheltering) and recovery (rebuilding, emergency funding, etc.).   This means that services offered to other residents must reasonably accommodate residents with disabilities.

Finally, completing this workbook, identifying the members of your Personal Support Network, and putting together emergency kits for your home, car, and person are only the beginning. We encourage you to learn more about disasters that can happen in your area. Contact the resources on the next page to learn more about disaster planning, first aid, and sheltering.

Remember, you are ultimately responsible for yourself. Being prepared is one of the most important things you can do to live up to that obligation.

Emergency Resources

All Emergencies –  Call 911

National and Statewide Emergency Resources

 

Poison Control Center, National

1-800-222-1222

Colorado Division of Wildlife                 

719-227-5200

Colorado State Patrol

303-239-4501

Colorado Department of Transportation

303-639-1111

Colorado Road Conditions           

511

United Way (Community Resource Info)

211


Pikes Peak Regional Emergency Resources

 

Poison Control Center, Local                                                        

719-776-5333

American Red Cross, Pikes Peak Chapter                                       

719-632-3563

Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region                                    

719-473-1741

Colorado Springs Fire Department                                                   

719-385-5950

Colorado Springs Office of Emergency Management                       

719-385-5957

Colorado Springs Police Department                                           

719-444-7000

Colorado Springs Utilities                                                                 

719-448-4800

El Paso County Dept of Health and Environment                              

719-578-3199

El Paso County Hazardous Waste Facility                                          

719-520-7878

El Paso County Sheriff                                                                       

719-390-5555

Park County Animal Control                                                              

719-836-4380

Park County Sheriff                                                                           

719-836-2494

Park County Dispatch, Non-Emergency                                            

719-836-4121

Park County Sheriff                                                                            

719-836-2494

Park County Dispatch, Non-Emergency                                           

719-836-4121

Teller County Office of Emergency Management                            

719-689-2988

Teller County Sheriff                                                                         

719-687-9652

 

Other Helpful Resources

 

Cell Phone Emergency Notification System    

Early warning calls or texts. 

www.elpasoteller911.org

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)   

Free basic training (719)385-5957  

cert@springsgov.com

Ready Colorado

Basic preparedness.  

http://www.readycolorado.com/

Pet Aid Colorado 

Preparedness for pets.

http://www.petaidcolorado.org/

Where to Get Emergency Information

Television Stations in Colorado Springs

Network

Call Sign

Channel

Website

NBC

KOAA-TV

5.1

www.koaa.com

CBS

KKTV

11.1

www.kktv.com

ABC

KRDO-TV

13.1

www.krdo.com

Fox

KXRM-TV

21.1

www.coloradoconnection.com

PBS

KTSC

8.1

www.rmpbs.org

UNI

KVSN-DT

48.1

www.univision.com

Radio Stations in Colorado Springs


Call Sign

Frequency

Genre

 Call Sign

 Frequency 

Genre

KCME

88.7 FM

Classical

 KTPL

100.3 FM

Christian

KTLC

89.1 FM

Gospel Music

 KBIQ

102.7 FM 

Christian

KEPC

89.7 FM

College

 KVUU

 103.1 FM

Top 40

KTLF

90.5 FM 

Religious

 KRXP

 103.9 FM 

Rock

KRCC

91.5 FM

Public Radio

 KRDO

 105.5 FM

News/Talk

KVRH

91.5 FM

Contemporary

 KTLF

 105.9 FM

Religious

KKPK

92.9 FM

Contemporary

 KIQN

 106.9 FM

Top 40

KILO

94.3 FM 

Rock

 KDZA

 107.9 FM

Classic Rock

KTLF

94.7 FM

Religious

 KVOR

 740 AM 

News/Talk

KATC

95.1 FM

Country

 KCBR

1040 AM

Religious

KIBT

96.1 FM

Hip Hop

 KLIM

1120 AM 

Contemporary

KLDV

96.5 FM

Christian

 KRDO

1120 AM 

Sports

KXPK

96.5 FM

Regional Mexican

 KKML

1300 AM

Sports

KCCY

96.9 FM

Country

 KVRH

1340 AM

Oldies

KTLF

97.5 FM

Religious

 KRLN

1400 AM

Oldies

KKFM

98.1 FM

Classic Rock

 KSKE

1450 AM

Talk

KYGO

98.5 FM

Unknown

 KZNT

1460 AM  

Talk

KKMG

98.9 FM

Top 40

 KXRE

1490 AM  

Spanish

KQMT

99.5 FM

Classic Rock

 KCMN

1530 AM 

Nostalgia

KVUU

99.9 FM

Top 40

 KWYD 

 1580 AM  

Talk

 

 

Other Sources of Information

Television and radio stations often have websites and Facebook accounts that have up-to-the- minute information.  Twitter is also a good resource for breaking news.

Checklist for Emergency and Disaster Preparation

This checklist is available to print and fill out in our workbook as pages 9 and 10.

      • Fill out the Emergency Information List.
      • Fill out the Medical Information List.
      • Fill out a Disability Specific Checklist.
      • Attach copies of your health insurance cards and related information to your Medical Information List.
      • Keep at least a thirty-day supply of essential medications with you at all times. Save one pill per month to keep in your emergency kit, and check your kit every six months to be sure your medications are not expired.
      • Have extra copies of prescriptions with you at all times.
      • Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about what you should do if you do not have enough medicine after a disaster. Also, find out the shelf life of your medication and the storage temperature it needs.
      • Determine how often you should replace stored medication.
  • Identify places to go during an:
      • Earthquake
      • Tornado
      • Hurricane
      • Flood
      • Fire
    • Install at least one smoke detector on each level of your home outside sleeping areas an change the batteries twice a year when you change your clocks for daylight savings time.
    • Find the location of utility cutoff valves and switches. Become familiar with how to operate them.
  • Identify as many exits as possible (at least two) from each room and from your building.
  • Make a floor plan of your home, including primary escape routes.
  • Practice your escape plan.
  • Decide what equipment you will need for assistance during an evacuation and if you need help from other people, especially if you need their assistance in moving you. Tell them about any injuries so that they do not hurt you during transfers.
  • Be ready to give brief, clear, specific instructions and directions to rescue workers, especially if you need their assistance in moving you. Tell them about any injuries so that they do not hurt you during transfers.
  • Register with the United Way (see insert) to arrange transportation in the event of an emergency.
  •  Become familiar with the emergency or disaster evacuation plan for your office, school, or other locations where you spend a lot of time.
  • Have an alternative place to stay if you are evacuated.
  • Have a plan to care for your pets.
  • Have a plan to care for your service animals.

Personal Support Network

A Personal Support Network is a group of people who come together to help keep one another safe in an emergency. The people in your Personal Support Network will work with you to prepare for a disaster. You might practice evacuating together, or work with one another to prepare emergency kits for your car, home, and to carry with you on your person. The following tips will help you develop your Personal Support Network:

Ask people you know and trust to be part of your Personal Support Network. Members of your Network can be relatives, neighbors, co-workers, or friends. You should have at least three people in your Personal Support Network for each location you spend a lot of time at (home, work, school, volunteer sites, etc.).

   Give copies of your Emergency Information, Medical Information, and Disability- Related Supply lists to members of your Personal Support Network.

   Have members of your Personal Support Network check on you if emergency officials issue an evacuation order, or if a disaster occurs. If you are Deaf or hard of hearing, have members of your Personal Support Network contact you when a siren or loudspeaker announces an emergency.

   Do not count on phone service during an emergency. Decide on signals members of your Personal Support Network can use in an emergency that all of you will understand. For instance, you can hang sheets outside your windows, shout to each other or use high- pitched noisemakers or bells to let one another know if an emergency is happening.

   Share important keys with your Personal Support Network so that they can enter your home, car, or other places if they need to.

   If you use special equipment of any sort, make sure members of your Personal Support Network know how to operate and safely move it. It is a good idea to make labels with instructions for your equipment.

   If you have a service animal, make sure the animal is familiar with members of your Personal Support Network. This will make it easier on your animal if it needs to receive care from someone other than you.

   If you need any type of personal assistance, make sure members of your Personal Support Network know what you need and how to provide it.

   Practice evacuating from your home, office, or school with members of your Personal Support Network. You should choose an emergency meeting place where you can reunite with your Personal Support Network after evacuating from your home, school, or office. Select a signal you can use to let your Personal Support Network know that you have safely evacuated if you cannot meet in person.

   Review and revise your plan with your Personal Support Network every six months, or as your situation changes.

Be sure to let your Personal Support Network know when you plan to travel!

Emergency Information List

 Please complete this form which is available in the workbook as page 14 and make copies to keep in each one of your emergency kits. Distribute copies to emergency contact personnel. this form covers your name, address, contact information. It also contains the contact information of your Personal Support Network contacts and Out-of-Town contacts.

Medical Information & Supply List

Please complete this form which is availiable in the workbook as pages 17 and 19 and make copies to keep in each one of your emergency kits. Distribute copies to emergency contact personnel.This form covers your Physician's name, phone number address and your medication/dosages. The below checklist is also included in those forms.

Supplies:

Check items you use and describe the item type and location.

  • Glasses:
  • Ostomy Supplies:
  • Eating Utensils:
  • Walker:
  • Grooming Utensils:
  • Crutches:
  • Dressing Devices:
  • Cane(s):
  • Writing Devices:
  • Dentures:
  • Hearing Devices:
  • Dialysis Equipment:
    • Oxygen:
    • Flow Rate:
  • Urinary Supplies:
  • Suction Equipment:
  • Wheelchair
    • Wheelchair Repair Kit:
    • Motorized:
    • Manual:
  • Sanitary Supplies:
  • Other:

Emergency Kits

At a minimum, you should have two emergency kits prepared: a personal kit that you can keep with you at all times, and a larger kit that you can keep at home. If you have a car, you should have a mobile emergency kit there, as well. Finally, if you have a service animal, you should keep a separate emergency kit to make sure you can care for your animal in the event of a disaster.

Your emergency kits should, at a minimum, allow you to sustain yourself for at least three days. Ideally, your kits should contain supplies for up to seven days. Depending on your disability, you may need items that are not included on the following lists. Please refer to the disability specific tips pages for ideas on additional items you might need. These checklists are available in our workbook on pages 19 and 20.

Personal Emergency Kit

  • Your personal emergency kit should contain essential items that you cannot live without, and you should keep it with you at all times.
  • Emergency Information List
  • Medical Information List and copies of insurance cards, prescriptions for medications, advance directives, and other important medical information. (Colorado Springs Fire Department’s File of Life Cards are also acceptable).
  • Cellphone
  • Cash
  • Essential medications – three day supply
  • Key ring flashlight
  • Flashlights with extra batteries or light sticks
  • Extra batteries for oxygen or breathing devices, hearing aids, cochlear implants, cell phones, radios, or other devices
  • Signaling device to draw attention to yourself if you need emergency assistance
  • (whistle, horn, beeper, bell, screecher, etc.)
  • Other Disability Specific Items:

Home Emergency Kit

  • Emergency Information List
  • Medical Information List and copies of insurance cards, prescriptions for medications, advance directives, and other important medical information.
  • Cell phone
  • Cash
  • Essential medications – seven day supply
  • Assorted plastic bags for storing food and waste.
  • Flashlights with extra batteries or light sticks
  • Extra batteries for oxygen or breathing devices, hearing aids, cochlear implants, cell phones, radios, or other devices
  • Signaling device to draw attention to yourself if you need emergency assistance(whistle, horn, beeper, bell, screecher, etc.)
  • Sturdy gloves to protect your hands from rubble and debris.
  • First aid kit and instruction book.
  • Emergency food – seven day supply of non-perishable items and water.
  • Roll of duct tape and plastic sheeting.
  • NOAA weather notification radio with batteries.
  • Other Disability Specific Items:

Car Emergency Kit

  • Emergency Information List
  • Medical Information List and copies of insurance cards, prescriptions for medications, advance directives, and other important medical information.
  • Non-perishable food items and water – at least a three day supply
  • Poncho or rain jacket.
  • 2 Blankets, preferably made of wool.
  • First aid kit and instruction book.
  • Other Disability Specific Items:

Service Animal Emergency Kit

  • Spare collar, license and vaccination records, along with a photo of the animal.
  • Food, treats, and water – at least a three day supply, but ideally a seven day supply.
  • Food and water dishes.
  • Brush, shampoo, and other relevant hygiene items.
  • Pooper scooper or plastic bags for waste disposal.
  • Animal first aid kit (medications, vitamins, contact information for local vet offices, tape, scissors, antibacterial soap, and cotton balls).
  • Paw pad protection and a wool blanket
  • Other Items:

Tips for People with Chemical and Food Sensitivities

Before a Disaster Happens

   Anticipate that emergency personnel will probably not be able to meet your needs during an emergency. Include air filtering items such as masks, or food items you can safely eat in all of your emergency kits. These checklists are available in our workbook on page 22.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

  • Chemical/Food Sensitivities:

    • Alternate cooking method
    • Antihistamine
    • Disposable hand wipes
    • Disposable plates and utensils
    • Epinephrine auto-injector
    • Ready-to-eat foods
    • Special dietary supplements
  • Breathing/Respiratory Limitations:

    • Alternate charging source
    • Alternate power source
    • Extra batteries, alternate power source, or charging system for oxygen and breathing devices
    • N95 rated particulate filter mask
    • Rechargeable batteries
    • Resuscitation bag
    • Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Check your emergency kits regularly to ensure food items and medications are not expired.
  • Ensure that masks, towels, and other supplies are clean and ready for use at regular intervals.

Tips for People with Cognitive Disabilities

Before a Disaster Happens

 Mark your calendar and check your emergency kits every six months. Make sure medications and food items are not expired. Update personal information on your Emergency and Medical Information Lists, and make sure you have current copies of your health insurance cards in your kits.

   If you drive, you should have three kits ready. If you do not drive, you should have two.

  • Car emergency kit.
  • Home emergency kit.
  • Personal emergency kit (to carry with you).

   Practice what you will do during a disaster at your job, home, school, or any place you spend a lot of time.

   Keep a list of tasks you will need to do in an emergency on a small tape recorder you can carry with you at all times. This will help you remember what you need to do.

   Make sure you give copies of your written emergency plan to the people in your Personal Support Network. You can call them, if it is safe, during an emergency.   Think about what an emergency worker will need to know. For example:

  • “I use a communication device. I can point to simple pictures or keywords.”
  • “I forget things easily. Please write down information for me.”

Practice your statement so that you remember it and can tell an emergency worker when you need to. These checklists and a worksheet for the written emergency plan can be found in our workbook on pages 24 and 25.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

Organizational Aids:

  • Color Post-it flags
  • Color Sticky Notes
  • Highlighter markers
  • Highlighter tape
  • Notebook

Prompting Devices:

  • Picture prompting books
  • Talking Photo Album
  • Voice Cue

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Practice what to do during and after specific disasters that occur in your area.
  • Keep a written emergency plan with you.
  • Give copies of your plan to people in your personal support network.
  • Think of ways to help you remember important things.
  • Practice how to tell someone what you need.
  • Mark your calendar to update your kits every six months.

Tips for People with Communication or Speech Limitations:

Before a Disaster Happens

  Figure out how you will let emergency personnel know what you need if you do not have communication devices with you (word boards, augmentative communication devices, artificial larynx, etc.).

  Store pads of paper and pens, copies of letter/word boards, or any other communication aids you believe you might need in all of your emergency kits.

  Make sure your Medical Information List explains the best way to communicate with you.

  If you use a computer frequently as a means of communication, make sure you have an alternative power source in your emergency kits. These checklists are available in our workbook on page 26.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

Low Tech Communication Aids:

  • Dry erase board
  • Laminated alphabet boards
  • Laminated communication board
  • Paper and pens

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Determine your ideal method of communication in the event of an emergency and be prepared to use it.
  • Store communication aids in all of your emergency kits.
  • Make an emergency health information card and be sure to include your
  • communication needs.
  • Store batteries or chargers for communication equipment.

Tips for People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

These checklists are available in our workbook on page 27.

Before a Disaster Happens

  • Store hearing aids in the same secure place consistently so that you can locate them easily after a disaster.
  • If possible, keep an extra hearing aid in your emergency supply kits.
  • Store extra batteries for hearing aids or implants in your emergency supply kits. Install both audible and visible smoke alarms in your home.
  • Decide how you will communicate with emergency personnel if there are no interpreters available, or if your hearing aids are not available/operational.
  • Carry a pre-printed card that says “I speak American Sign Language.”
  • Periodically remind TV stations that they must broadcast all emergency information in open caption format and have interpreters on camera.
  • When travelling, make sure hotels have access packets for people who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Ask for them when you check in.
  • Paper and pens

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

  • Alternate power source or charging system for your smart phone or pager
  • Extra power cord for your smart phone or pager
  • Amplification systems – pocket talker  
  • Cell phone amplifier
  • Consider getting a weather radio with a visual/text display that warns of weather emergencies
  • Dry erase board
  • Extra cochlear implant batteries Extra hearing aid batteries Portable phone amplifier
  • Vibrating watch

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Store and maintain extra hearing aids and batteries.
  • Install both audible and visual smoke alarms.
  • Write down key phrases for emergency workers.

Tips for People With Life Support Systems

Before a Disaster Happens

   Figure out which facilities or providers can meet your needs if your usual provider cannot help you or your system becomes inoperable.These checklists are available in our workbook on pages 29 and 30.

   Find out more about the following issues:

  • Alternative power sources that can keep you going for up to seven days.
  • Manually operated equipment.
  • The use of a vehicle battery to power equipment.

   Generally, gasoline powered generators are preferable to other types. If you opt for a gasoline powered generator, be sure to test it periodically, store gasoline safely, and keep a syphon kit on hand in the event you have to get gasoline from a vehicle.

   If you use a battery powered backup system, be sure to make sure batteries are charged periodically. You may ask your utility company for advice on the use and maintenance of your backup power supply.

   If you are registered with Colorado Springs Utilities, they will give you advance information about planned outages only.

Secure life support equipment with welded (not bent) chains to prevent damage.

Make sure everyone in your Personal Support Network knows how to operate and move your equipment. Attach instructions to all machines.

Oxygen Users:

  • Find out if using a reduced flow rate during an emergency will help your system
  • Post “Oxygen in Use” signs so that emergency personnel can identify them easily.
  • Make sure you can get to the shut-off switch for your equipment quickly in an emergency.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

Breathing/Respiratory Limitations:

  • Alternate charging source
  • Alternate power source
  • Extra batteries, alternate power source, or charging system for oxygen and breathing devices
  • N95 rated particulate filter mask
  • Rechargeable batteries
  • Resuscitation bag
  • Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply

Mobility Limitations:

  • Bottle openers
  • Cooling aids
  • Dressing aids
  • Drink holders
  • Drinking aids – long straw, uDrink
  • Eating aids
  • Reachers
  • Writing aids

Medical Needs:

  • Blood pressure monitor
  • Medi-straw
  • Medication reminders/alarms
  • Nail Clippers
  • Pill boxes Pill splitter Pill popper
  • Pill swallowing cup
  • RX Magnifiers
  • Talking Glucose Meter
  • Thermometers
  • USB MediTag

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Make sure vital equipment is secured.
  • Keep an up-to-date list of alternate providers in your emergency kits.
  • Obtain an alternative power source.
  • Make sure everyone in your Personal Support Network knows how to operate your equipment, including backup power sources.
  • Test your backup power sources regularly.
  • Register with the United Way and Colorado Springs Utilities.
  • Teach members of your Personal Support Network how to operate and move all equipment, and keep instructions with each piece.

Tips for People With Mobility Limitations

Before a Disaster Happens

Keep a personal emergency kit attached to your walker, wheelchair, or scooter.

Store any assistive technologies (canes, crutches, walkers, wheelchairs, etc.) you use close by in a consistent and secure place.

   If you use a motorized wheelchair, keep extra batteries with your emergency kits. Ask your vendor if you can recharge batteries by connecting jumper cables to a vehicle battery, and if there are any special converters available that would allow you to recharge with a vehicle cigarette lighter.

   Keep a patch kit or a can of “seal in air” in your emergency kits if you do not have

puncture proof tires on your wheelchair.

   If you can obtain one, keep a lightweight manual wheelchair with your emergency kits (at least your larger home kit).

   Prepare for the possibility that you will have to leave your chair behind in an evacuation.

Practice lifting and carrying techniques with members of your Personal Support Network, and be prepared to let emergency personnel know how they can help you move best.

   If you regularly spend time in places where you use elevators, practice evacuating from those areas without using the elevator.

   Secure furniture in your home, office, or anyplace you spend a lot of time to prevent possible barriers.

   Keep a pair of heavy gloves with you at all times, just in case you have to wheel over glass or debris.

These checklists are available in our workbook on pages 32 and 33.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

  • Heavy gloves for wheeling over glass or debris.
  • Bottle openers
  • Cooling aids
  • Dressing aids
  • Drink holders
  • Drinking aids – long straw, uDrink
  • Eating aids
  • Reachers
  • Writing aids

Disability Specific Checklist

  • Secure furniture to prevent barriers.
  • Store mobility aids in convenient and secure locations.
  • Practice evacuating with your Personal Support Network.

Tips for People With Psychiatric Disabilities

Before a Disaster Happens

   There are several ways you might react to an emergency on emotional, mental, or physical levels. It is important to anticipate reactions you may have and think through strategies for coping with them.

  • It is possible that the following emotional responses might occur or become more severe during and after an emergency: confusion, fear, paranoia, sadness, panic, depression, withdrawal, irritability, and anxiety.
  • You might also experience one or more of the following: difficulty with memory or mental processing, shaking, pacing, shouting, or crying.

   Seek advice from friends, family, therapists, or other service providers on additional ideas for coping.

   Let members of your Personal Support Network know what your plans are, and keep them apprised so that they can lend support during an emergency.

   Think about what an emergency worker will need to know. For example:

  • “I have a panic disorder. If I panic, (instructions for medication or other

intervention).”

 Practice your statement so that you remember it and can tell an emergency worker when you need to.

These checklists and forms are available in our workbook on page 33.

Disability Specific Checklist

      • Practice communicating your needs.
      • Think about and plan for the reactions you may have during and after a disaster.

Tips for People with Visual Disabilities

These checklists are available in our workbook on page 36.

Before a Disaster Happens

        • Keep extra canes (if you use them) in secure and consistent locations at home, work, school, or anyplace you spend a lot of time in so that you can get around obstacles and hazards if you need to.
        • Place security lights around travel paths if you have some vision.
        • Think about how you will navigate without audio cues, which you might not be able to rely on during or after a disaster.
        • Label supplies with large print, fluorescent tape, or Braille.
        • Secure special equipment such as electronic magnifiers or computers.
        • Remind news outlets to not only show important phone numbers on screen during an emergency, but to announce them slowly and repeat them for people who cannot read the screen.

Items to Add to Emergency Kits

    • Big Print Address Book
    • Book light
    • Cell phone magnifier
    • Extra batteries, alternate power source or charging
    • Extra glasses
    • Have high-powered flashlights with wide beams and extra batteries
    • Liquid Level Indicator
    • Magnifiers
    • Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print or Braille
    • Signature guide
    • Talking watch
    • Talking clock/calendar
    • NOAA weather radio with extra batteries.

 

Disability Specific Checklist

      • Label supplies in your emergency kits so that you can access items easily.
      • Keep extra canes handy in consistent and secure locations (if you use them).

How to Shelter in Place

Emergency personnel may tell you to shelter in place during certain kinds of disasters, like chemical spills. “Shelter in place” essentially means to take immediate shelter wherever you are at. You will need to pay attention to authorities to find out whether you need to simply take refuge where you are or take additional measures to seal the room to prevent outside air from coming in.

The items in your Home Emergency Kit should help you shelter in place for up to seven days. Here are some additional tips to help you prepare to take shelter immediately:

      • Choose a room in advance for you to shelter in. Select a room with as few windows and doors as possible.  A master bedroom with an attached bathroom would be ideal.
      • Contact your workplace, children’s schools, or anyplace you have family to find out what their shelter in place plans are.
      • At work, help make sure that emergency plans involve all employees. The safety planning team should have prescribed duties, and alternates should be assigned for each duty just in case someone is out for the day.
      • Check your emergency kits a regular basis.
      • Register for the “reverse 911” system at  www.elpasoteller911.org/ to get notifications sent to your cell phone.
      • Bring service animals, pets, and children indoors immediately when a shelter in place order is issued.
        • If children are at school, they will be sheltered there.
        • Set up a place for your animals to relieve themselves indoors.
      • Close and lock all doors and windows, and close shades, curtains, and blinds.
      • Turn off your heating or air conditioning system, along with all fans.
      • Close your fireplace or woodstove flues.
      • If you are instructed to seal the room, use duct tape and plastic sheeting to seal all cracks around doors and windows. Tape over vents and electrical outlets, too.
      • Evacuate only when instructed to do so by emergency personnel.
      • Contact your Personal Support Network to let them know that you are safe.
      • Keep abreast of updates using an NOAA weather radio, which should be in your home emergency kit.

Knowing How an Emergency Might Affect Your Disability

Disaster situations can be overwhelming – both physically and emotionally. It is important to understand how stress related to a disaster can impact your disability. Anyone affected by a disaster may experience one or more of the following symptoms:

Thought

Behavior

  • Poor concentration
  • Confusion
  • Slowness of thought
  • Limited ability to communicate verbally or in writing
  • Forgetfulness
  • Poor judgment
  • Limited ability to think of alternatives or prioritize
  • Hyperactivity
  • Angry outbursts
  • Limited objectivity
  • Withdrawal, isolation, or distancing
  • Increased use of tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs
  • Avoidance of activities or places
  • Family problems

Psychological or Emotional

Physical

  • Anxiety
  • Irritability or restlessness Depression or crying Anger or blaming
  • Apathy or diminished interest in usual activities
  • Feelings of isolation or estrangement
  • Feelings of guilt about surviving Denial or constricted feelings
  • Exaggerated reactions to being startled
  • Recurrent nightmares
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Headaches
  • Weakness
  • Nausea or upset stomach
  • Sore muscles Sweating or chills
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Heavy feeling in arms or legs
  • Lump in your throat
  • Chest pain
  • Tremors
  • Fatigue
  • Increase in allergies, colds, or flu
  • Heart palpitations

References

Assistive Technology Partners, CU Denver

Colorado Springs Emergency Preparedness and Safety Guide

Disaster Preparedness for People with Disabilities, American Red Cross Disaster Services

Disasters R Us, disAbility Preparedness

Inclusive Preparedness Center

Independent Living Resource Center, San Francisco:Publications – Emergency Preparedness

Kansas DHE: Emergency Preparedness – Kansans with Disabilities Can Be Healthy

Nobody Left Behind: Disaster Preparedness for Persons with Mobility Impairments. Resources

Preparing for a Disaster for People with Disabilities and other Special Needs, American Red Cross

FEMA, Individuals with Access & Functional Needs

 

Spare collar, license and vaccination records, along with a photo of the animal.