Tag Archives: legislation

Disability Law Series: The Air Carrier Access Act

The road to civil liberties and rights for those with disabilities has been a long one.  Over the next few weeks, we will highlight some of the most influential Federal civil rights law that ensures equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities.

This week we are highlighting the Air Carrier Access Act. The Air Carrier Access Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in air travel, and requires air carriers to accommodate the needs of passengers with disabilities.

Some examples of what this act includes are:

  • Carriers may not refuse transportation to people on the basis of disability. If a carrier excludes a handicapped person on safety grounds, the carrier must provide the person a written explanation of the decision.
  • Airlines may not require advance notice that a person with a disability is traveling.
  • Carriers may require up to 48 hours’ advance notice for certain accommodations that require preparation time (e.g., respirator hook-up, transportation of an electric wheelchair on an aircraft with less than 60 seats).
  • New aircrafts (planes ordered after April 5, 1990 or delivered after April 5, 1992) with 30 or more seats must have movable aisle armrests on half the aisle seats in the aircraft.
  • Aircrafts with more than 60 seats and an accessible lavatory must have an on-board wheelchair, regardless of when the aircraft was ordered or delivered. For flights on an aircraft with more than 60 seats that do not have an accessible lavatory, carriers must place an on-board wheelchair on the flight if a passenger with a disability gives the airline 48 hours’ notice that he or she can use an inaccessible lavatory but needs an on-board wheelchair to reach the lavatory.
  • Airport facilities owned or operated by carriers must meet the same accessibility standards that apply to Federally-assisted airport operators.

Sources:

http://www.disabilitytravel.com/airlines/air_carrier_act.htm

http://airconsumer.dot.gov/rules/FAQ_5_13_09.pdf

Disability Law Series: The Telecommunications Act

The road to civil liberties and rights for those with disabilities has been a long one.  Over the next few weeks, we will highlight some of the most influential Federal civil rights law that ensures equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities.

This week we are highlighting the Telecommunications Act of 1996. This act requires manufacturers of telecommunications equipment and providers of telecommunications services to ensure that such equipment and services are accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

What this act achieved was the ability for people with disabilities to have access to a large variety of products and services, like phones, pagers, call-waiting and operator services.

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 changed the way we work, live and learn. It affected telephone service, cable programming, broadcast services and services provided to schools.

More Resources:

For more information regarding the Telecommunications Act (http://transition.fcc.gov/telecom.html)

Disability Law Series: The Americans with Disabilities Act

The Americans with Disabilities Act

The road to civil liberties and rights for those with disabilities has been a long one.  Over the next few weeks, we will highlight some of the most influential Federal civil rights law that ensures equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities.

The most notable act is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. The ADA prohibits any kind of

discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, State and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. 


What is a Disability?

1) Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or major life activities OR The ADA has a three-part definition of disability.  Under the ADA, an individual with a disability is a person who:

2) Has a record of such an impairment OR

3) Is regarding as having such an impairment

A physical impairment is defined by the ADA as “any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory, cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin and endocrine. A mental impairment is a mental or psychological disorder such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities.

The Details of the ADA

Title I of the ADA requires employers to provide qualified individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to benefit from the full range of employment-related opportunities available to others. This means it prohibits discrimination in recruitment, hiring, promotions, training, pay, social activities, and other privileges of employment.

Title II requires that State and local governments give people with disabilities an equal opportunity to benefit from all of their programs, services, and activities. This could include public education, recreation, health care, social services, and voting.

The transportation section of Title II covers public transportation services, such as city buses and public transit. According to the ADA, public transportation authorities may not discriminate against people with disabilities in regards to the provision of their services.

Title III of the act covers businesses and nonprofit service providers that are public accommodations. Public accommodations must comply with basic nondiscrimination requirements that prohibit exclusion, segregation, and unequal treatment. They also must comply with specific requirements related to architectural standards for new and altered buildings.

More Resources:

For more information on the ADA, visit their website: http://www.ada.gov

Frequently asked questions about the ADA

History of the ADA

Links to Federal web sites and other web sites with disability-related information: https://www.disability.gov/ 

Myths and Facts about the ADA

Share with:

Facebook Twitter Google LinkedIn


Sidebar_leaf

Sign up for email updates!

Find out what’s going on and how you can get involved by receiving our email updates and quarterly newsletter.

2 Internal: MailChimp email signups right sidebar
Stay informed about programs, advocacy updates and more. Your information will be kept private.
Sending

Sidebar_divider

Sidebar_leaf

Do you need In-Home Health Care?

You can choose to receive care from our staff or a qualified caregiver of your choosing.

Find out if you qualify.

Sidebar_divider

Meet new people,
Make new friends!

Check out our peer support and recreational groups that you can join!

Click here to find out more.

Sidebar_divider