Emergency Preparedness Starts With YOU

A disaster can happen at any time, so it’s important to be prepared. One important way to prepare is to have an emergency kit. There are different types of emergency kits for different aspects of your life.

What Types of Emergency Kits Should You Have?

Personal Kit: A kit to keep with you at all timesHome Kit: Larger kit that you can keep at home

Mobile Kit: A kit for your car

Service Animal Kit: Separate kit to care for your animal in the event of a disaster

What Should be in Your Emergency Kits?

Personal Emergency Kit
Your personal emergency kit should contain essential items that you cannot live without, and you should keep it with you at all times.

  • Emergency Contact List
  • Medical Information List
    • Copies of insurance cards
    • Prescriptions for medications
    • Advance directives
    • Any other important medical information
    • Cell phone (and charger)
    • Cash
    • Essential medications
      • Three day supply
      • Key ring flashlight
      • Flashlights (with extra batteries) or light sticks
      • Extra batteries for:
        • Oxygen or breathing devices
        • Hearing aids
        • Cochlear implants
        • Cell phones
        • Radios
        • Other devices
        • Signaling device to draw attention to yourself if you need emergency assistance:
          • Whistle horn
          • Beeper, bell
          • Screecher

Home Emergency Kit
Your home emergency kit should contain some of the items in your personal kit, as well as essential items that will keep you safe in your home during a disaster.

  • Emergency Contact List
  • Medical Information List
    • Copies of insurance cards
    • Prescriptions for medications
    • Advance directives
    • Any other important medical information
    • Cell phone (and charger)
    • Cash
    • Essential medications
      • Seven day supply
      • Assorted plastic bags for storing food and waste
      • Flashlights )with extra batteries) or light sticks
      • Extra batteries for:
        • Oxygen or breathing devices
        • Hearing aids
        • Cochlear implants
        • Cell phones
        • Radios
        • Other devices
        • Signaling device to draw attention to yourself if you need emergency assistance:
          • Whistle horn
          • Beeper, bell
          • Screecher
          • First aid kit and instruction book
          • Emergency food
            • Seven day supply of non-perishable items and water
            • Roll of duct tape and plastic sheeting
            • Sturdy gloves to protect your hands from rubble and debris

Mobile Emergency Kit
Your mobile emergency kit should be left in your car.

  • Emergency Contact List
  • Medical Information List
    • Copies of insurance cards
    • Prescriptions for medications
    • Advance directives
    • Other important medical information
    • Non-perishable food items and water
      • At least a three day supply
      • Poncho or rain jacket
      • Blankets
      • First aid kit and instruction book

Service Animal Emergency Kit
Your service animal emergency kit are separate from your personal and home kits, and should contain essential items to keep your animal safe during a disaster.

  • License and vaccination records
  • Photo of the animal
  • Food, treats, and water
    • At least a three day supply (but a seven day supply is ideal)
    • Food and water dishes
    • Hygiene items
      • Brush
      • Shampoo
      • Pooper scooper or plastic bags for waste disposal
      • Animal first aid kit
        • Medications
        • Vitamins
        • Contact information for local vet offices
        • Tape
        • Scissors
        • Antibacterial soap
        • Cotton balls

Your emergency kits should allow you to sustain yourself for at least three days. If possible, your kits should contain supplies for up to seven days. Depending on your disability, you may need items that are not included on the following lists. You can refer to our Personal Emergency Preparedness Workbook for ideas on additional items for specific disabilities.

Download the Personal Emergency Preparedness Workbook here: PDF